Son of the Morning Star

Son of the Morning Star

Book - 1984
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Baker & Taylor
Portrays the life of General Custer and describes the massacre of him and his forces by the Indians at the Little Bighorn

McMillan Palgrave
Custer's Last Stand is among the most enduring events in American history--more than one hundred years after the fact, books continue to be written and people continue to argue about even the most basic details surrounding the Little Bighorn. Evan S. Connell, whom Joyce Carol Oates has described as "one of our most interesting and intelligent American writers," wrote what continues to be the most reliable--and compulsively readable--account of the subject. Connell makes good use of his meticulous research and novelist's eye for the story and detail to re-vreate the heroism, foolishness, and savagery of this crucial chapter in the history of the West.



Publisher: San Francisco : North Point Press, 1984
ISBN: 9780865471603
0865471606
Characteristics: 441 p. : ill., maps on end papers ; 24 cm

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General Custer lost the Battle of the Bighorn big time, see. Yes, he was a brave man, and foolhardy. You wouldn't have wanted to be a member of his company, unless you had a death wish, or were dominated by your very own death instinct ( see Freud ). "..he did not know why Custer escaped scalping. Yellow Hair might have been lying under so many bodies that he was overlooked. The Americans went down like sheep, Rain said. It was as easy as killing sheep." "All three bluecoat armies---Crook, Terry, Gibbon--were under surveillance by Sioux and Cheyennes." "Custer's soldiers were almost surrounded by the time Rain got there. They had dismounted, he said, but climbed back on their horses, dismounted again, and split into several companies. They were shooting very fast. After a while some of them began riding toward Reno's troops, but Indians followed them like blackbirds following a hawk." "So much gunsmoke and dust obscured the field it would have been hard to recognize one's best friend." "Hideous things appeared. Through the dust appeared a bloody Sioux, leaving the fight. Wooden Leg saw him walk toward a ravine." "Where the Sioux and Cheyennes separated is not known, probably somewhere along the Powder. Before going their own ways they held a parade." "After this parade the Cheyennes continued north to the Yellowstone, which they called the Elk."

j
johnbacich
Apr 22, 2017

This is the gold standard for Bighorn accounts. This book would be a must read even if you weren't particularly interested in the subject. If you're looking for the best, and least biased account of the battle, this ids the one to read.

h
hewhite2003
Jan 11, 2015

The description of this book does not match the book. The book is about Custer's life. The description refers to the Medici.

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