Not-so-nuclear Families

Not-so-nuclear Families

Class, Gender, and Networks of Care

Book - 2005
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Rutgers University Press

In recent years U.S. public policy has focused on strengthening the nuclear family as a primary strategy for improving the lives of America's youth. It is often assumed that this normative type of family is an independent, self-sufficient unit adequate for raising children. But half of all households in the United States with young children have two employed parents. How do working parents provide care and mobilize the help that they need?

In Not-So-Nuclear Families: Class, Gender, and Networks of Care, Karen V. Hansen investigates the lives of working parents and the informal networks they construct to help care for their children. She chronicles the conflicts, hardships, and triumphs of four families of various social classes. Each must navigate the ideology that mandates that parents, mothers in particular, rear their own children, in the face of an economic reality that requires that parents rely on the help of others. In vivid family stories, parents detail how they and their networks of friends, paid caregivers, and extended kin collectively close the "care gap" for their school-aged children.

Hansen not only debunks the myth that families in the United States are independent, isolated, and self-reliant units, she breaks new theoretical ground by asserting that informal networks of care can potentially provide unique and valuable bonds that nuclear families cannot.


In Not-So-Nuclear Families: Class, Gender, and Networks of Care, Karen V. Hansen investigates the lives of working parents and the informal networks they construct to help care for their children. She chronicles the conflicts, hardships, and triumphs of four families of various social classes. Each must navigate the ideology that mandates that parents, mothers in particular, rear their own children, in the face of an economic reality that requires that parents rely on the help of others. In vivid family stories, parents detail how they and their networks of friends, paid caregivers, and extended kin collectively close the "care gap" for their school-aged children.



Book News
Hansen's study of the informal childcare networks that working parents construct refutes the myth that families in the US are independent, isolated and self-reliant units. The study is based on extensive interviews with four low, moderate and high-income white, working families. Based on her research, Hansen (sociology and women's studies, Brandeis U.) presents a series of policy suggestions for improving the environment in which working families raise children. Annotation ©2004 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Publisher: New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, c2005
ISBN: 9780813535012
0813535018
9780813535005
081353500X
Characteristics: xviii, 261 p. : ill. ; 24 cm

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