Last Boat Out of Shanghai

Last Boat Out of Shanghai

The Epic Story of the Chinese Who Fled Mao's Revolution

Book - 2019
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"The dramatic, real-life stories of four young people caught up in the mass exodus of Shanghai in the wake of China's 1949 Communist Revolution--a precursor to the struggles faced by emigrants today. Shanghai has historically been China's jewel, its richest, most modern and westernized city. The bustling metropolis was home to sophisticated intellectuals, entrepreneurs, and a thriving middle class when Mao's proletarian revolution emerged victorious from the long civil war. Terrified of the horrors the Communists would wreak upon their lives, citizens of Shanghai who could afford to fled in every direction. Seventy years later, the last generation to fully recall this massive exodus have opened the story to Chinese American journalist Helen Zia, who interviewed hundreds of exiles about their journey through one of the most tumultuous events of the twentieth century. From these moving accounts, Zia weaves the story of four young Shanghai residents who wrestled with the decision to abandon everything for an uncertain life as refugees in Hong Kong, Taiwan, and the U.S. Young Benny, who as a teenager became the unwilling heir to his father's dark wartime legacy, must choose between escaping Hong Kong or navigating the intricacies of a newly Communist China. The resolute Annuo, forced to flee her home with her father, a defeated Nationalist official, becomes an unwelcome young exile in Taiwan. The financially strapped Ho fights deportation in order to continue his studies in the U.S. while his family struggles at home. And Bing, given away by her poor parents, faces the prospect of a new life among strangers in America" -- Provided by publisher.
Shares the real-life stories of four people who lived through the mass exodus from Shanghai in the wake of China's 1949 Communist revolution.
Publisher: New York :, Ballantine Books,, [2019]
ISBN: 9780345522320
Characteristics: xxix, 499 pages : illustrations, map ; 25 cm

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StarGladiator
May 14, 2019

****************** 50 STARRED Review *****************************
The subtitle of this book is most apt:
The Epic Story of the Chinese Who Fled Mao's Revolution
Epic describes this book, an epic achievement by the scholar, Helen Zia! Her rendering of the historicity of events and the times is impeccable!
The imperial globalists' intrusions and heavy handed interference, subversion and social destruction; the unbelievable brutal savagery of the Japanese military; the ineptitude of the Nationalists [followed by the Nationalists' massacre of Taiwanese]; the impossible plight of Chinese refugee/immigrants in 1950s America, et cetera, et cetera.
Superbly and humanely described and explained by the scholar Zia, we are gifted with an extravagantly told history of epic proportion - - followed by the depressing takeover by Maoist communists.
[My personal take on Chinese history - - no doubt many will disagree with my opinion - - was that the Mongols forged the various Chinese kingdoms, tribes and factions into a single entity, which was later effectively destroyed - - or at least vastly weakened - - by the anti-progress policies and rule of the Ming Dynasty. Had China's once great fleet of the most advanced surface ships still existed, it is highly doubtful the Opium Wars would have succeeded.]

s
StarGladiator
May 14, 2019

****************** 50 STARRED Review *****************************
The subtitle of this book is most apt:
The Epic Story of the Chinese Who Fled Mao's Revolution
Epic describes this book, an epic achievement by the scholar, Helen Zia! Her rendering of the historicity of events and the times is impeccable!
The imperial globalists' intrusions and heavy handed interference, subversion and social destruction; the unbelievable brutal savagery of the Japanese military; the ineptitude of the Nationalists [followed by the Nationalists' massacre of Taiwanese]; the impossible plight of Chinese refugee/immigrants in 1950s America, et cetera, et cetera.
Superbly and humanely described and explained by the scholar Zia, we are gifted with an extravagantly told history of epic proportion - - followed by the depressing takeover by Maoist communists.
[My personal take on Chinese history - - no doubt many will disagree with my opinion - - was that the Mongols forged the various Chinese kingdoms, tribes and factions into a single entity, which was later effectively destroyed - - or at least vastly weakened - - by the anti-progress policies and rule of the Ming Dynasty. Had China's once great fleet of the most advanced surface ships still existed, it is highly doubtful the Opium Wars would have succeeded.]

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